Best fitness assessment to Help Manage Health and Performance 2019

A fitness assessment is a great benchmark to measure whether you are in a safe health zone or on target to hit a performance level. Due to the development of technology over the last 20 year. Fitness assessment has become easy to monitor and give more accuracy. So where are only the best of the best of high-level athletes could only have the tests done. The production of test fitness assessment kits has got easier has and more accessible that everybody can manage there own health and fitness level. For example the Fitbit.

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Rate my body

Rate my body one of the most often lines I get from a client. there are so many ways to rate your body. The first thing to understand is the difference between a health assessment and fitness assessments. There are two types of assessments. Maximal(true ability) and submaximal (protentional ability).

When we talk about health assessments we need to understand the components that make up the health.

What are the requirements of a fitness assessment?

In constructing fitness assessment, it is important to make sure that they really measure the factors required to be tested, and are thus objective rather than subjective. In doing so all fitness assessment should, therefore, be specific.

In conducting a fitness assessment, the following points should be considered:

  • Each fitness assessment should measure ONE factor only
  • The fitness assessment should not require any technical competence on the part of the athlete (unless it is being used to assess technique)
  • Care should be taken to make sure that the athlete understands exactly what is required of him/her, what is being measured and why
  • The test procedure should be strictly standardized in terms of administration, organization and environmental conditions

What are the benefits of fitness assessment

The results from tests can be used to:

  • predict future performance
  • indicate weaknesses
  • measure improvement
  • enable the coach to assess the success of his training program
  • place the athlete in the appropriate training group
  • motivate the athlete

What factors may influence fitness assessment results?

The following factors may have an impact on the results of a test (test reliability):

  • The ambient temperature, noise level, and humidity
  • The amount of sleep the athlete had prior to testing
  • The athlete’s emotional state
  • The medication the athlete may be taking
  • The time of day
  • The athlete’s caffeine intake
  • The time since the athlete’s last meal
  • The test environment – surface (track, grass, road, gym)
  • The athlete’s prior test knowledge/experience
  • The accuracy of measurements (times, distances etc.)
  • Is the athlete actually applying maximum effort in maximal tests?
  • Inappropriate warm up
  • People present
  • The personality, knowledge, and skill of the tester
  • Athlete’s clothing/shoes
  • The surface on which the test is conducted
  • Environmental conditions – wind, rain, etc

Health-related components of fitness and health assessments

Aerobic endurance

The ability to do a prolonged exercise routine using oxygen(walking/jogging) without getting tired

fitness assessments

maximum treadmill test

12 min copper run

Chester Step Test

Objective

The Chester Step Test was developed by Sykes (1998)[1] to monitor the development of the athlete’s cardiovascular system

 

 

Required Resources

To undertake this test, you will require:

  • A 15-30cm inch high bench or step
  • Stopwatch
  • Metronome or cadence tape
  • Heart rate monitor
  • Borg 6-20 perceived exertion table
  • An assistant

The box height is determined as follows:

  • 15cm – is generally suitable for those over 40 years of age who take little or no regular physical exercise and for those under-40’s who are moderately overweight.
  • 20cm – is generally suitable for those under 40 years of age who take little or no regular physical exercise and for those under-40’s who are moderately overweight.
  • 25cm – is generally suitable for those over 40 years of age who regularly take physical exercise with moderately vigorous exertion.
  • 30cm – generally suitable for those under 40 years of age who regularly take physical exercise with moderately vigorous exertion

How to conduct the fitness assessment

Before starting the test, the assistance needs to record:

  • The athlete’s Maximum Heart Rate (MHR) – use 220-age
  • The athlete’s 80% of Maximum Heart Rate (MHR80) – use MHR x 0.8

The Chester Step Test is conducted as follows:

    • The assistance explains to the athlete the test requirements:
      • You will step up and down onto the box in time with the metronome.
      • Every 2-minutes the metronome will be increased by 5 steps/minute.
      • At each 2-minute period I will record your heart rate and ask you to tell me the Borg rating for your perceived exertion and if your heart rate is greater than your MHR80 or your perceived exertion level is above a certain value then the test will end.
      • The test will end after 10 minutes of stepping
      • Continue stepping whilst I record your heart rate and ask for your perceived exertion level
      • The assistance checks the athlete’s understanding of the test requirements.
    • Set the metronome to 15 beats/minute
    • The athlete steps up and down, one foot at a time, onto the box for 2 minutes
    • After 2 minutes set the metronome to 20 beats/min
      • The assistance records the athlete’s heart rate
      • The athlete identifies their perceived exertion value on the Borg Scale
      • If the heart rate is greater than the athlete’s MHR80 value or their perceived exertion value is greater than 14 then stop the test
    • The athlete steps up and down, one foot at a time, onto the box for 2 minutes
    • After 2 minutes set the metronome to 25 beats/min
      • The assistance records the athlete’s heart rate
      • The athlete identifies their perceived exertion value on the Borg Scale
      • If the heart rate is greater than the athlete’s MHR80 value or their perceived exertion value is greater than 14 then stop the test
    • The athlete steps up and down, one foot at a time, onto the box for 2 minutes
    • After 2 minutes set the metronome to 30 beats/min
      • The assistance records the athlete’s heart rate
      • The athlete identifies their perceived exertion value on the Borg Scale
      • If the heart rate is greater than the athlete’s MHR value or their perceived exertion value is greater than 14 then stop the test
    • The athlete steps up and down, one foot at a time, onto the box for 2 minutes
    • After 2 minutes set the metronome to 35 beats/min
      • The assistance records the athlete’s heart rate
      • The athlete identifies their perceived exertion value on the Borg Scale
      • If the heart rate is greater than the athlete’s MHR80 value or their perceived exertion value is greater than 14 then stop the test
  • The athlete steps up and down, one foot at a time, onto the box for 2 minutes
  • After 2 minutes stop the test and record the athlete’s heart rate

Muscular Strength

The ability to move a maximal load that can be over for one repetition

1 Rm test

Bench Press Test

Testing and measurement are the means of collecting information upon which subsequent performance evaluations and decisions are made but, in the analysis, we need to bear in mind the factors that may influence the results.

Objective

The objective of the bench press test is to evaluate an athlete’s upper body strength.

 

 

Required Resources

To undertake this test, you will require:

  • Barbell and weights
  • Weighing Scales
  • Bench
  • Assistant

How to conduct the test

This test requires the athlete to complete as many bench presses as possible with no rest.

  • The assistant weighs and records the athlete’s weight
  • The athlete warms up for 10 minutes
  • The assistant loads the barbell with a weight close to the athlete’s one repetition maximum load.
  • The athlete conducts bench presses until they are unable to continue
  • The assistant acts as a spotter for the athlete and counts the number of successful bench presses
  • If the number of bench presses exceeds 10 then the athlete rests for 10 minutes, the assistant increases the barbell weight and the athlete repeats the test
  • The assistant uses the maximum load calculator to determine the athlete’s 1RM.

 

Single leg squat

Single arm press up

Muscular Endurance

The ability to move a submaximal load for a prolonged period of time without getting tired.

Wall Sit

Objective

To monitor the development of the athlete’s quadriceps strength endurance.

 

 

Required Resources

To undertake this test, you will require:

  • Flat non-slip surface
  • Smooth wall
  • Stopwatch
  • Assistant

How to conduct the test

This test requires the athlete to balance on one leg in the squat position for as long as possible.

  • The athlete warms up for 10 minutes
  • The athlete assumes a sitting position with their back against the wall, feet flat on the ground and a 90° angle at the hips and knees
  • The assistant gives the Command “GO” and starts the stopwatch
  • The athlete lifts the right foot 5cm off the ground
  • The assistant stops the stopwatch and records the time when the athlete’s foot is put back on the ground
  • The athlete repeats the test for the left foot following a short rest
Wall Squat

Assessment

The following normative data is available for this test.

The following table (Arnot and Gaines 1984) is the national norms for 16 to 19-year-olds.

Gender Excellent Above Average Average Below Average Poor
Male >102 secs 102 – 76 secs 75 – 58 secs 57 – 30 secs <30 secs
Female >60 secs 60 – 46 secs 45 – 36 secs 35 – 20 secs <20 secs

Flexibility

The range of movement around a joint or series of joints

Sit and reach

 

Body Composition

The percentage of fat compared to total body weight

Measuring body fat percentage is an easy method of discovering correct body weight and composition. Beneath the skin is a layer of subcutaneous fat, and the percentage of total body fat can be measured by taking the ‘skinfold’ at selected points on the body with a pair of calipers. This test only requires four measurements. A similar alternative method is the Yuhasz skinfold test which requires six measurements.

Objective

The objective of this test is to monitor the athlete’s level of body fat.

Required Resources

To undertake this test, you will require:

  • Skinfold calipers
  • Assistant
Calipers Body Fat

 

 

Measurement Sites

The assistant records measurements taken from the following sites:

Triceps Triceps

The athlete’s arm to hang naturally by their side. The assistant takes a vertical fold midway between the shoulder and the elbow on the back of the arm.

Subscapula Subscapula

The assistant takes a diagonal fold across the back, just below the shoulder blade.

Biceps Biceps

The athlete’s arm to hang naturally by their side. The assistant takes a vertical fold midway between the shoulder and the elbow on the front of the arm.

Suprailiac Suprailiac

The assistant takes a diagonal fold just above the hip bone.

How to conduct the test

  • The assistant takes the measurements, in millimeters, on the right side of the athlete’s body
  • The assistant picks up the skin fold between the thumb and the index finger so as to include two thicknesses of the athlete’s skin and subcutaneous fat
  • The assistant locates the calipers about one centimeter from the fingers and at a depth equal to the thickness of the fold
  • The assistant repeats each measurement three times and records the average value
  • The assistant records the sum of the four measurements and uses this value to assess the athlete’s percentage of body fat

 

Fitness-related components of fitness and fitness assessment

Stability

The ability to maintain joint alignment in a static and dynamic environment

Balance

Required Resources

To undertake this test, you will require:

  • Warm dry location – gym
  • Stopwatch
  • Assistant

How to conduct the test

  • The athlete warms up for 10 minutes
  • The athlete stands comfortably on both feet with their hands on their hips
  • The athlete lifts the right leg and places the sole of the right foot against the side of the left kneecap
  • The assistant gives the command “GO”, starts the stopwatch and the athlete raises the heel of the left foot to stand on their toes
  • The athlete is to hold this position for as long as possible
  • The assistant stops the stopwatch when the athlete’s left heel touches the ground, or the right foot moves away from the left knee
  • The assistance records the time
  • The athlete rests for 3 minutes
  • The athlete stands comfortably on both feet with their hands on their hips
  • The athlete lifts the left leg and places the sole of the left foot against the side of the right kneecap
  • The assistant gives the command “GO”, starts the stopwatch and the athlete raises the heel of the right foot to stand on their toes
  • The athlete is to hold this position for as long as possible
  • The assistant stops the stopwatch when the athlete’s right heel touches the ground, or the left foot moves away from the right kneecap
  • The assistance records the time
Stork Test

fitness assessment

The following normative data is available for this test.

The following table (Johnson & Nelson 1979) are national norms for 16 to 19-year-olds.

Excellent Above Average Average Below Average Poor
Males >50 41-50 31-40 20-30 <20
Females >30 23-30 16-22 10-15 <10

The following table (Schell & Leelarthaepin 1994) are norms for male and females.

Excellent Above Average Average Below Average Poor
Males >50 37-50 15-36 5-14 <5
Females >27 23-27 8-22 3-7 <3

For an evaluation of a 16 to 19-year-old athlete’s performance select the gender, enter the total time and then select the ‘Calculate’ button.

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